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Afghan Hound

 Photo of Afghan Hound
Photo: courtesy of Jill Cross

Afghan Hound Books

Group: Hound || Breed Standard

History

The Afghan Hound was introduced to England by Captain John Barff in the late 1800s. A native of Afghanistan, where rock carvings dating back to 2200 B.C. portray the breed as it still looks today, there is also evidence that suggests the Afghan Hound was known in Egypt as far back as 3000 B.C. Due to its ability to execute powerful leaps, run swiftly and turn readily, the Afghan is valued in hilly terrain, and are commonly used in Afghanistan by shepherds to protect their sheep from wolves. Sometimes known as the Kabul Dog, the Afghan was originally bred for hunting large game such as antelope, gazelle, wolves and snow-leopards over rugged terrain.

Description

Ideal Height: dogs: 68-74 cms (27-29 ins); bitches: 63-69 cms (25-27 ins)

A true aristocrat — an elegant dog, giving the impression of both strength and dignity together with speed and power. The head is long, but not too narrow. The ears are carried close to the head and covered with long silky hair. They have a strong, long neck which gives a proud head carriage. Their back is level and well muscled, falling slightly away to the stern. The loin is straight and rather short and hipbones rather prominent and wide apart. The tail is sparsly feathered, curls at the end and is raised when in action. Their forefeet are strong and very large, both in length and breadth, while the hindfeet are long but not as broad as the forefeet. They have a smooth and springy movement. Their coat is long and very fine, except along their back and face, with a distinctive top-knot. All colours are acceptable.

Character/Temperament

The Afghan has an independent and very lively nature, but although independent and tough, they are also sensitive and want plenty of attention from their family. They are aloof with strangers, not showing a lot of interest in them. But with their family and friends show a great deal of affection and, despite their elegance and exotic appearance, are always ready to act the clown!

Breed Health

The breed is a relatively healthy breed, although there have been hereditary cataract problems in the past. The KC operate a check system, which is often carried out at shows for anyone who wishes to take advantage of it.

Breed Care

The breed is a relatively healthy breed, although there have been hereditary cataract problems in the past. The KC operate a check system, which is often carried out at shows for anyone who wishes to take advantage of it.

Exercise

It must be remembered that, despite their elegant looks and long tresses, this breed was developed for hunting by sight. They require a good deal of free running exercise. However, once running free, the Afghan can cover a great distance in a very short time, and can become head strung and very difficult to call back. Therefore it is imperative that and off-lead exercising is done in a safe, secure area. The Afghan owner must remember that they were bred for hunting and coursing, and as such can have a tendancy to chase other animals!

Training

With their aloof and independent nature, Afghans can sometimes be difficult to train. Being a senstive breed, harsh methods of training should never be used, the Afghan will respond much better by reward and praise. If your Afghan seems to be staring into the distance when training, he has merely decided that your command is not worthy of his attention! To train the Afghan you must find out what motivates him. The Afghan will only do what he wants to do! See our books on training


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Last link added: 11 Mar, 2008