Breed Standard

Origins

The Samoyed dog takes its name from the Samoyedic peoples of Siberia. An alternate name for the breed, especially in Europe, is Bjelkier. These nomadic reindeer herders bred the smiling dogs to help with the herding, to pull sleds when they moved, and to keep their owners warm at night by sleeping on top of them.

Description

Height: dogs: 51-56 cms (20-22 ins) at shoulder; bitches: 46-51 cms (18-20 ins) at shoulder. Weight in proportion to size. They don't just come in white, but cream and biscuit as well. They have a double coat with thick undercoat, which sheds on a regular basis, and long guard hairs which provide a waterproof outer layer.

Character/Temperament

Samoyeds' friendly disposition makes them poor guard dogs, but excellent companions, especially for small children or even other dogs, and they remain playful into old age. With their sled dog heritage, a Samoyed is not averse to pulling things, and an untrained Samoyed has no problem pulling its owner on a leash rather than walking alongside. They will instinctively act as herd dogs, and when playing with children, especially, will often attempt to turn and move them in a different direction. The breed is characterized by an alert and happy expression which has earned the nickname "Sammy smile".

Breed Health

Samoyeds are typically a hardy dog, but do have their share of health concerns. Hip dysplasia is a concern and Samoyeds are prone to diabetes and other diseases if their owners are not careful. Although not particularly known in the UK, eye problems like cataracts and glaucoma and other retinal problems have been seen in the breed. Samoyeds will typically live 10 to 15 years.

Breed Care

In spring and autumn when moulting, the undercoat is renewed; then the old coat comes out in tufts. One can comb it deeply, with a metal comb, which will speed up the shedding process and allow the Samoyed to regain its usual appearance more quickly (without this he may walk about for several days with a hard bald back). Giving a bath itself has several disadvantages, soap or shampoo destroy the skin suint (an oily secretion which makes the coat shine) and remove the dog's own natural protection. Furthermore, water, trapped in the very thick undercoat, has difficulty evaporating and may remain in the fur. They have to be groomed at least twice a week, more in the spring and autumn when they moult. To keep the Samoyed's coat gleaming, their diet must be looked after carefully and contain a good amount of meat and fish.

Training

Samoyeds can be known to be stubborn at times and difficult to train, due to unwillingness rather than lack of intelligence, it takes a patient owner to get them to competition level.

See our books on training" />
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Samoyed

 Photo of Samoyed
Photo: Courtesy of Kalnovitch - New Zealand

Samoyed Books

Group: Pastoral - Breed Standard

Origins

The Samoyed dog takes its name from the Samoyedic peoples of Siberia. An alternate name for the breed, especially in Europe, is Bjelkier. These nomadic reindeer herders bred the smiling dogs to help with the herding, to pull sleds when they moved, and to keep their owners warm at night by sleeping on top of them.

Description

Height: dogs: 51-56 cms (20-22 ins) at shoulder; bitches: 46-51 cms (18-20 ins) at shoulder. Weight in proportion to size. They don't just come in white, but cream and biscuit as well. They have a double coat with thick undercoat, which sheds on a regular basis, and long guard hairs which provide a waterproof outer layer.

Character/Temperament

Samoyeds' friendly disposition makes them poor guard dogs, but excellent companions, especially for small children or even other dogs, and they remain playful into old age. With their sled dog heritage, a Samoyed is not averse to pulling things, and an untrained Samoyed has no problem pulling its owner on a leash rather than walking alongside. They will instinctively act as herd dogs, and when playing with children, especially, will often attempt to turn and move them in a different direction. The breed is characterized by an alert and happy expression which has earned the nickname "Sammy smile".

Breed Health

Samoyeds are typically a hardy dog, but do have their share of health concerns. Hip dysplasia is a concern and Samoyeds are prone to diabetes and other diseases if their owners are not careful. Although not particularly known in the UK, eye problems like cataracts and glaucoma and other retinal problems have been seen in the breed. Samoyeds will typically live 10 to 15 years.

Breed Care

In spring and autumn when moulting, the undercoat is renewed; then the old coat comes out in tufts. One can comb it deeply, with a metal comb, which will speed up the shedding process and allow the Samoyed to regain its usual appearance more quickly (without this he may walk about for several days with a hard bald back). Giving a bath itself has several disadvantages, soap or shampoo destroy the skin suint (an oily secretion which makes the coat shine) and remove the dog's own natural protection. Furthermore, water, trapped in the very thick undercoat, has difficulty evaporating and may remain in the fur. They have to be groomed at least twice a week, more in the spring and autumn when they moult. To keep the Samoyed's coat gleaming, their diet must be looked after carefully and contain a good amount of meat and fish.

Training

Samoyeds can be known to be stubborn at times and difficult to train, due to unwillingness rather than lack of intelligence, it takes a patient owner to get them to competition level.

See our books on training


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